The No List

The No List
When I say no (e.g., conference talk invites, “pick my brain” invitations, jury solicitations), I immediately add my regret to >the No List. I nurture this growing list of no-things, adding category data like dates events would have happened, themes, and date turned down.

Suddenly, I’m making list of cities not seen, airplanes not embarked, and time saved, rather than time taken away. Several >months later, I have a made a substantial something. It’s how I’ve …..

The no list is an interesting idea that I think I should try and put into practice. May be you will be intrigued by the idea too. I am quite sure it will give quite the revelations about oneself and will be a great insight to how our mindset has changed over the time besides, how we have valued my time.

via Minimal Mac

Jens Voigt's hour record

Crazy Jens voigt rode his bike for an hour yesterday and damn it was a record :). The most loved and admired racer winds up his time on the bike and boy his last effort on the bike was true to his character. The fighter and the entertainer he is, the hour record was a fitting finish to his biking career. I am still mind blown by the fact that at the age of 43 some could ride 51.11kms in an hour. Jens Voigt’s hour record is amongst his career best and will be an inspiration for any cyclist. He will always be remembered and cherished as the best entertainer on the bike.
Wishes to him for a great life ahead.

Must

When who we are and what we do are one and the same, we are walking the road of Must. When we choose Must, what we create is ourselves. It is a body of work. When we make something because we Must, not just because we can, it is the difference between disposable products that last a few years and life-affirming movements that sustain generations.

The cross roads of should and must by elleluna is lengthy read, but it is well worth the time spent and worth even more when you start pondering over it especially with you and your life in context.

Meandering to Nowhere particular

Read this today morning, it rings a bell. If your life feels like its running in a loop like mine sometimes, these are the probable reasons.

Big dreams: The goal isn’t consistent impact or meaningful work, it’s a huge hit, the star turn and the ability to change the world. It wouldn’t be enough to have 1000 true fans, the big dreamer wants a stadiumful in every town.

Poor work habits: Flitting from project to project, waiting for inspiration to arrive, stalling, not taking lessons, repeating the same early steps over and over…

Shortcut seeking: Why bother with the long route when you can find a shorter, faster path? Get-rich-quick schemes, insider access and the quest to get it right now.

Lottery thinking: This is a variation of shortcut thinking, but it involves getting picked. One person, one organization, one Wizard of Oz who will magically make it all happen.

Lack of self-awareness: The self-delusion that your stuff is in fact world-class, and that the critics, all of them that you’ve managed to interrupt, are wrong.

Please do read it in Seth’s own words here

Daily Routines

A daily walk. For many, a regular daily walk was essential to brain functioning. Soren Kierkegaard found his constitutionals so inspiring that he would often rush back to his desk and resume writing, still wearing his hat and carrying his walking stick or umbrella. Charles Dickens famously took three-hour walks every afternoon — and what he observed on them fed directly into his writing. Tchaikovsky made do with a two-hour walk, but wouldn’t return a moment early, convinced that cheating himself of the full 120 minutes would make him ill. Beethoven took lengthy strolls after lunch, carrying a pencil and paper with him in case inspiration struck. Erik Satie did the same on his long strolls from Paris to the working class suburb where he lived, stopping under streetlamps to jot down notions that arose on his journey; it’s rumored that when those lamps were turned off during the war years, his productivity declined too.

Not just geniuses, most people even half a century ago had routines and they were defined by their daily routines. Just recollect how your grandparents lived their life with routines. Their character and traits were defined by their habits. Its nothing new that our habits define who we are, where we end up. Having some routine that helps us accomplish our long term goals is definitely a no brainer. A Simple habit that adds value to a long term goal is the best way to start with habits if you don’t have a routine.