Daily Routines

A daily walk. For many, a regular daily walk was essential to brain functioning. Soren Kierkegaard found his constitutionals so inspiring that he would often rush back to his desk and resume writing, still wearing his hat and carrying his walking stick or umbrella. Charles Dickens famously took three-hour walks every afternoon — and what he observed on them fed directly into his writing. Tchaikovsky made do with a two-hour walk, but wouldn’t return a moment early, convinced that cheating himself of the full 120 minutes would make him ill. Beethoven took lengthy strolls after lunch, carrying a pencil and paper with him in case inspiration struck. Erik Satie did the same on his long strolls from Paris to the working class suburb where he lived, stopping under streetlamps to jot down notions that arose on his journey; it’s rumored that when those lamps were turned off during the war years, his productivity declined too.

Not just geniuses, most people even half a century ago had routines and they were defined by their daily routines. Just recollect how your grandparents lived their life with routines. Their character and traits were defined by their habits. Its nothing new that our habits define who we are, where we end up. Having some routine that helps us accomplish our long term goals is definitely a no brainer. A Simple habit that adds value to a long term goal is the best way to start with habits if you don’t have a routine.

You win some, you lose some

 

None of this is news. One of the paradoxes of technology is that it connects us and isolates us at the same time. We get more, faster, but cannot help wondering if that is always better. We have more to read and more to watch, more to learn and more to transact, more friends and more followers — and yet we can somehow feel less satisfied.

A good food for thought. Technology connects yet isolates people in a peculiar way. Interactions just end up as mere transactions. It is our responsibility to add value to these transactions to make them more meaningful connections.

Awareness & Procrastination

Earlier this month I posted about the types of procrastination and I came across on Leo Babauta’s post on procrastination. He makes a strong case that procrastination is a mindfulness problem. Agreed, Awareness is the essence of procrastination. Being Unaware is mostly the cause for procrastination, but lack of awareness is the cause of failure at anything, be it procrastination or a simple task of buying vegetables. I don’t say this is to undermine the point Leo makes, but to suggest that improving our awareness and being mindful is easily the best step towards a better life, a more happier and a calmer life. Meditation helps with your awareness and spending 20-30 minutes meditating everyday is totally worth. Sadhguru says if you cant dedicate 30 minutes a day to help yourself, nobody can help you.