Tech for staying healthy

“Health is wealth” they say, yet we some times take our body for granted and abuse it. In the Indian tradition body is taught to be a temple and as a path way to a greater dimension. With modernisation and time constraints, our body is just a mode of transport for us to fulfil all our earthly needs. We care hardly about our body internals. Unless there is some trouble we take it for ride with what not. Most of us seem to be proactive with everything but not with our health.

Everybody will have a breaking point and till that we won’t realise the need for staying healthy, but it doesn’t have to be that way. What we eat and how we live defines our quality of life. You can either wait for a breaking point to realise the need to stay healthy or go read this long article about Vittici’s life and how he is putting technology to keep him healthy.
It is quite a long read, but one that is worth the time. I use my iPhone and the health app as well to keep track of my health. Some of the apps I use are different though. I use Myfitnesspal, Garmin connect with a Vivofit, Strava and Sleep cycle Some might say I am obsessed, yeah so what the hell, it is my health. :)

How do you keep yourself healthy?

7 life lessons

I stumbled on Brain pickings over a year back and to this day it just amazes me everyday. Can’t recommend this site enough. I have a few links saved up for reading in Instapaper. Today was this gem. Nothing really fancy and nothing new either, but the way she puts it across is just brilliant, especially this one

The best ideas come to us when we stop actively trying to coax the muse into manifesting and let the fragments of experience float around our unconscious mind in order to click into new combinations.

The 7th lesson is good reminder to self especially at times like this. Do read all the lessons.

On keeping a Diary

Continuing with yesterdays topic about journaling and diaries, Maria Popova on the creative benefits of keeping a diary 

We are creatures of remarkable moodiness and mental turbulence, and what we think we believe at any given moment — those capital-T Truths we arrive at about ourselves and the world — can be profoundly different from our beliefs a decade, a year, and sometimes even a day later.

The benefits to keeping a diary is numerous to say the very least. That said, the entire article is a very nice read about how diaries have helped authors shape themselves and their writing. Don’t forget to read the article.

A Reflection on One Year of Daily Journaling – The Newsprint

A Reflection on One Year of Daily Journaling – The Newsprint:

I have been journaling for some time now using Dayone (around 2 years now), and use to keep a physical diary during school and college days. The feeling of putting pen to a paper and writing was just so delightful. The constant experimentation to find the right nib(tip) to suit my handwriting, the fresh smell of paper etc are somethings I have come to miss over the past few months.

Josh Ginter in his very elaborate piece about his journaling workflow has just urged me to get back to pen and paper. The post is very lucid and elegant, the pictures subtly create a desire to immediately go try out journaling on paper. Do read the article, and try out journaling if you have never tried.

(Via thenewsprint.co)

” Just because I liked something at one point in time doesn’t mean I’ll always like it, or that I have to go on liking it at all points in time as an unthinking act of loyalty to who I am as a person, based solely on who I was as a person. To be loyal to myself is to allow myself to grow and change, and challenge who I am and what I think. The only thing I am for sure is unsure, and this means I’m growing, and not stagnant or shrinking.” ― Jarod Kintz